We’re not comfortable until you are.

If you’ve lived in Dunedin, Florida, for long, you already know that warm, summerlike weather lasts for most of the year. Your heat pump keeps you cool in warm weather, but can it keep you comfortable in the winter, too? Find out whether your heat pump will keep you warm during a Florida winter and learn why this type of heating system is smart for Dunedin homeowners.

Heat Pumps Work Best in Mild Winters

Heat pumps have the power to cool and heat, but they might struggle to keep up in certain climates. Most heat pump systems achieve optimal efficiency in areas where the temperature rarely drops below the freezing point. That means the Dunedin area, which has an average wintertime low of about 50 degrees, is ideal for these versatile systems.

Variable-Speed Systems Are Ideal for Comfort

If you’re concerned about staying warm throughout the chilly winter months, consider investing in a variable-speed system like the Trane XV20i heat pump. This Trane TruComfort system can make minute adjustments to its heating output, ensuring you stay comfortable inside no matter the weather. This heat pump is designed to keep your home’s temperature within a half of a degree of your thermostat setting, so your home will always feel just right.

Efficient Heat Pumps Keep Energy Costs Low

With the right heat pump, it’s easy to keep your utility costs low and reduce your household energy consumption. At Advanced Cooling Systems, we recommend Energy Star-certified heat pumps, which meet or exceed national energy guidelines. A high-efficiency system like the Trane XV18 heat pump has a heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF) rating of up to 10. This means it’ll help keep your heating costs in check throughout the winter.

Whether you’re in the market for a new heat pump or you want to learn how to get the most out of your current system, our HVAC professionals are at your service. Call Advanced Cooling Systems, Inc. at 866-827-7662 for new system installation, maintenance, and HVAC consultations.

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